Most Common Types of Arthritis and How to Treat Them

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Joint pain can be caused by various things, from an injury to arthritis. It can be incredibly debilitating, making even the simplest tasks difficult. There are several different types of joint pain, each with its causes and treatments. If you are looking for some of the best care available we recommend you look up Integrated Orthopedics.

But to get you more informed on the topic let’s discuss the most common types and cover some of the treatment options available for each type.

Common Types of Joint Pain

There are several different types of joint pain. These can be caused by various things, from an injury to arthritis. It can be incredibly debilitating, making even the simplest tasks difficult. There are many causes and treatment options for each type listed below — some more common than others — but it is recommended that you see a doctor for any of them.

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Reactive Arthritis

Reactive arthritis, also called Reiter’s Syndrome, is a type of arthritis caused by an infection, usually in the genitourinary tract. It can cause pain, swelling, stiffness in the joints, and inflammation of the eyes and urethra. Treating reactive arthritis typically includes antibiotics to clear the infection and anti-inflammatory medications to reduce inflammation.

The most common treatments for reactive arthritis are antibiotics and anti-inflammatory medications. Your doctor will determine which one you need and for how long.

Doctors specializing in the treatment of reactive arthritis are mostly rheumatologists. You can find one near you by using a locator service.

Infectious Arthritis

Infectious arthritis is another type of arthritis caused by an infection in the joints. It can also cause a fever, decreased appetite, and pain when moving. Treatment options include oral or intravenous antibiotics in mild cases and surgery for more severe cases where the infection has spread.

The most common treatments for this type of arthritis are antibiotics, given orally or intravenously. Surgery may also be necessary in severe cases.

Your doctor will determine the best treatment option for you and whether you need antibiotics. Specialists most often treat infectious arthritis in infectious diseases or rheumatology.

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Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis, and it affects the joints by causing the cartilage that typically protects them from wearing away. This can lead to pain, swelling, and stiffness in the joints. Treatment for osteoarthritis typically includes medications to reduce pain and inflammation, physical therapy to improve mobility, and exercise to strengthen muscles around the affected joints.

The primary treatment for osteoarthritis is medications, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), acetaminophen, corticosteroids, or disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Physical therapy is typically recommended to improve mobility and strengthen muscles around the affected joints.

Osteoarthritis is typically treated by rheumatologists, doctors who specialize in treating arthritis.

Gout

Gout is caused by an abnormally high amount of uric acid in the blood. It can cause sudden, intense pain, tenderness, and redness in the joints, especially the big toe. Treatment for this type of arthritis typically includes medications to reduce the production of uric acid and antigout medicines to treat acute flare ups.

The primary treatment for gout is medications to lower uric acid levels. This can include allopurinol, probenecid, or xanthine oxidase inhibitors. Antigout medication is also typically prescribed to help treat acute flare ups.

Gout is most often treated by a rheumatologist or an internist specializing in kidney and urinary tract diseases. You can find one near you by using a locator service.

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Psoriatic Arthritis

Psoriatic arthritis is caused by an autoimmune reaction that attacks both the joints and skin cells at once. Symptoms include pain, stiffness, swelling, and tenderness in one or more joints combined with red, inflamed skin patches. Treatment for psoriatic arthritis typically consists of medications that reduce inflammation and suppress the immune system.

The primary treatment for psoriatic arthritis is medication, such as methotrexate or sulfasalazine, which can help relieve joint pain and stiffness symptoms. Corticosteroids can also be prescribed to reduce inflammation. Immunosuppressants, such as methotrexate or leflunomide may also be used to suppress the immune system. Rheumatologists most often treat psoriatic arthritis.

Lupus

Lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease that causes inflammation and swelling in the joints and many other symptoms. It can cause fatigue, arthritis, chest pain, difficulty breathing, and other serious complications. Treatment for this type of arthritis typically includes physical therapy to improve mobility and medications to reduce inflammation and pain.

The primary treatment for lupus is medications to reduce inflammation and pain. This can include corticosteroids, antimalarials, immunosuppressants, or biologics. Physical therapy may also be recommended to improve mobility.

Lupus is most often treated by rheumatologists or internists specializing in caring for people with autoimmune diseases.

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Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is a type of arthritis that affects children aged 16 or younger. It causes pain, swelling, stiffness in the joints, and other symptoms such as a fever or rash. Treatment for juvenile idiopathic arthritis typically includes medications to reduce inflammation and pain, physical therapy to improve mobility, and exercise to strengthen muscles.

The primary treatment for juvenile idiopathic arthritis is medication, such as NSAIDs or corticosteroids, to reduce inflammation and pain. Immunosuppressant drugs may also be used to suppress the immune system. Physical therapy can help improve mobility, and children may participate in exercise programs that focus on strengthening muscles around affected joints.

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is most often treated by pediatricians, rheumatologists, or orthopedists.

Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition that causes widespread pain and tenderness in the muscles and joints. It also causes fatigue, sleep problems, mood swings, and memory issues. There is no known cure for fibromyalgia, but treatment can help improve symptoms.

The primary treatment for fibromyalgia is medications to reduce pain and fatigue. This can include NSAIDs, antidepressants, or anticonvulsants. Some people with fibromyalgia also find relief from complementary therapies, such as acupuncture, massage, and tai chi.

Fibromyalgia is most often treated by rheumatologists or internists who specialize in caring for people with autoimmune diseases.

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Hidradenitis Suppurativa

Hidradenitis suppurativa is characterized by painful bumps under the skin. The bumps typically contain non-cancerous white blood cells, part of your body’s immune system. This type of arthritis can lead to abscesses and scarring in the armpits, groin, or other body parts, depending on where it occurs. Treatment for this type of arthritis typically includes certain antibiotics or surgery to remove affected tissue.

The primary treatment for hidradenitis suppurativa is antibiotics to clear the infection and surgery to remove affected tissue. In some cases, immunosuppressants may also be prescribed to suppress the immune system. Dermatologists or surgeons most often treat hidradenitis Suppurativa.

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is a type of arthritis that causes pain and swelling in the joints and affects other organs in the body. Rheumatoid arthritis symptoms include fatigue, morning stiffness, and warmth or redness in affected joints.

The primary treatment for rheumatoid arthritis is medication to reduce inflammation and pain. This can include NSAIDs, corticosteroids, or disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Rheumatologists most often treat rheumatoid arthritis.

Arthritis can be a very disabling condition, but many treatments can help improve symptoms. If you are struggling with arthritis, be sure to talk to your doctor about the best treatment plan for you. Also, it would be best to seek out a support group, either in person or online, to connect with others who are dealing with the same condition.

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