Top 5 Places In Ireland All Couples Need To Visit

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Img source: sykescottages.co.uk

When you’re in a new country or town, all you see and experiences seem better and more exciting. Dating is no exception – so things are moving faster because when you are back home you might be text messaging for months to the person you like before you go on a date. After then, you can date for months before you take the next step to be a couple. When you’re are not home, and you are in some foreign country on limited time without jobs, and in person, it means that things are definitely going to move at a different pace. With the development of new technologies, now you can use dating sites and apps to meet someone. 

Going online to find partner often means having to stand out from the crowd, so you’ll need to think of ways to make an instant impression with your chatting partner. If you’re getting to know someone special on a site like www.flirt.com  and are considering somewhere to suggest for a romantic break, look no further than the so-called Emerald Isle. The island of Ireland is one of the most enchanting of all destinations for visitors, famed for its rich Celtic history, culture, architecture and landscapes, and the warmth and hospitality of its people. What better way to impress your new partner than suggesting any of these five places?

Giant’s Causeway

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Located on the weather-worn coastland of County Antrim on the northeast of Ireland, this is a natural rock formation dating back to around 60 million years ago. Resulting from volcanic activity, there are over 37,000 columns, mostly hexagonal, which appear too perfect not to be the product of some flamboyant architect! Before the advent of modern science which was able to pinpoint exactly how old these structures were, the locals had all sorts of ideas about their origin – principally, that they formed part of a causeway running all the way to the coast of Britain, built by an Irish giant so he could make his way over the Irish Sea to do battle with a Scottish rival.

Killarney

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Visitors are drawn to Ireland’s towns and cities for their wealth of places of interest, but it’s sometimes great to escape to more tranquil surrounds. If you head southwest to County Kerry, you’ll discover Killarney National Park, spread over 103 square kilometers of enchanting forest and meadows. Here you might glimpse the only red deer herd in the whole of Ireland, or explore a scenic lake where you and your partner can enjoy a boat trip. A network of well-kept paths allows you to enjoy the surroundings, either by foot or if you’d prefer something more romantic, in a horse-drawn carriage.

Dublin

Img source: nationalgeographic.com

Dating locations don’t come much more romantic than Ireland’s capital. This bustling city is home to one-third of the country’s population, and although it’s certainly a European metropolis, its shops and restaurants dealing in Euros, there’s a relaxed atmosphere, exacerbated by the friendly Dubliners. Must-see places include Trinity College (founded by Queen Elizabeth I in 1592), housing the famed Book of Kells, dating from the 9th century, as well as numerous examples of historic architecture. Aside from the cultural highlights, there are plenty of options for settling down to enjoy local cuisine, washed down with a pint of ‘the black stuff’ – Ireland’s world-renowned Guinness.

Titanic Belfast

Img source: wikipedia.org

Situated on land reclaimed from Belfast Lough, Titanic Belfast is recommended for your romantic getaway. Everyone knows the story of the Titanic, then the world’s largest ship, which sunk after striking an iceberg on its maiden voyage in 1912. Here the story is vividly recreated over 12,000 square meters of exhibition areas, galleries and, of course, refreshment areas. There’s also a reproduction of the ship’s grandiose central stairwell, as featured in James Cameron’s record-breaking movie about the disaster.

Dingle Peninsula

Img source: ireland.com

You can’t get any further west on mainland Ireland than the Dingle Peninsula, a landscape jutting out into the wild Atlantic Ocean. This is a fabulous place to get away from it all with your other half, its rugged terrain giving the impression you’re far from the crowds, and yet with ready access to amenities and welcoming accommodation. Keep an eye out for ancient settlements dating from the Bronze Age (approx. 3000 – 600 B.C.), but for more contemporary activities, there are unspoiled miles of coastline ideal for surfing or simply paddling around in the shallows.

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