Earl Sweatshirt tells all in New York Times profile

The New York Times has released Earl Sweatshirt's most revealing profile since returning from Samoa in February.

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- May 2, 2012

The New York Times has released Earl Sweatshirt's most revealing profile since returning from Samoa in February. And he's been busy with various projects, including his own record label, a Sony imprint named Tan Cressida. The piece covers much debated topics like his relationship with his mother (“I know I’m not as considerate as I should be.”) and his best-loved single Earl, which he refuses to listen to after working with sexual assault victims for community service:

“I had already come to the conclusion that I was done talking about” that sort of subject matter, he said, but coming face to face with young people who had suffered in that way was overwhelming. “There’s nothing that you can — there’s no — you can’t evade the — there’s no defense for like — if you have any ounce of humanity”

But Sweatshirt's not done with Odd Future by a long shot. He's recording a collaborative effort with Tyler, the Creator called EarlWolf and an album with the Internet's Matt Martians. But perhaps most significantly, Earl turned down more lucrative deals so all Tan Cressida releases could bear the Odd Future logo. You should read the entire thing, if only because NYT’s been knocking these musician profiles out of the park recently.

For old times sake, and because you'll probably never hear him play it live, listen to “Earl” below:

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