Godhead, It’s Not Their Debut For Posthuman Records

Even though goth-industrial band Godhead have already released three albums ('94s Godhead, '96s Nothingness and '98s Power Tool Stigmata) many young goths are going to discover them for the first time with their fourth album, 2000 Years Of Human Error. The reason behind this stems from the fact that Marilyn Manson signed them as his first band to his new label, Posthuman Records.

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- Nov 21, 2000

Even though goth-industrial band Godhead have already released three albums ('94s Godhead, '96s Nothingness and '98s Power Tool Stigmata) many young goths are going to discover them for the first time with their fourth album, 2000 Years Of Human Error. The reason behind this stems from the fact that Marilyn Manson signed them as his first band to his new label, Posthuman Records. Vocalist Jason Miller doesn't feel that he has won the lotto by signing to the label, as the foursome, comprised of The Method (bass/programming), Mike Miller (guitars) and James O'Connor have worked hard to make it this far in their career and consider their connection to Manson a result of it."Yeah, I don't really mind that [people will think this is our debut]. I knew that that was going to happen, especially when we signed with Manson's label because he's exposing us to more people than we've ever been exposed to before. It is just something that comes with the territory, I guess," the vocalist says while resting comfortably in the dressingroom prior to their opening slot on Manson's Guns, God & Government World Tour. (Obviously one of the perks signing to Posthuman.)Years of touring and releasing three underground albums have garnered the band a large following among goths in the know and Jason believes, "for them, I am sure it’s a treat because we were sort of a secret for a long time." Although on the other hand, devoted fans might start screaming, "SELL-OUT!"Their debut for Posthuman Records isn't much of a departure from their previous albums but they've received creative assistance in the form of executive producer Marilyn Manson and guest guitarist Reeves Gabrels, a longtime friend of the band. Manson contributed vocals on "Break You Down" and spent a great deal of time honing a track they've recorded in the past, a cover of the Beatles' "Eleanor Rigby." Gabrels, a long time David Bowie guitarist back in the Tin Machine days, co-produced and played guitar on "Tired Old Man.""That's my favourite track just because it is an epic, I guess, or the closest thing we have to it. It runs the gammit of a lot of dynamics. It's not ever going to be a single because it's too long. But it's just sort of a good representation of our sound."When asked if they were worried that Manson might be a major creative force in the studio, Jason remarked, "Someone like Marilyn Manson is not going to stifle our creativity or censor us in any way. The label that we were on was having a lot of financial difficulties and we were looking for other labels, but I think this was the best place we could go. If we went to some of the other labels we were showcasing for like Columbia or Atlantic or something like that, they would have a lot more creative control over us then Manson. In his studio, we just do whatever we want to do."Many fans are just starting to experience Godhead either when they see them open for Marilyn Manson or they've heard their contribution to the Blair Witch II Soundtrack ("The Reckoning"). 2000 Years Of Human Error drops sometime in January, but fans or the curious might start hearing more of "The Reckoning" or "Break You Down."Many radio station programmers might be more interested in the band if they're serviced "Break You Down," as Manson sings on it, but Godhead aren't concerned about that: "We knew signing with the label all of the stigma that would attach us to Manson. We're prepared to deal with that. It's not like anybody is getting in there and telling us what to do. We're doing our own thing."

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